Tag Archives: Angels

City of Heavenly Fire by Cassandra Clare (review by Catherine H. ’17)

City of Heavenly Fire (The Mortal Instruments, #6)City of Heavenly Fire by Cassandra Clare
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The sixth and final book of The Mortal Instruments is packed with adventure, action, betrayal, loss, and so much more. Sebastian has begun attacking Institutes and using Lilith’s Infernal Cup to turn Shadowhunters into Endarkened, stripping away their humanity and willpower. Fearing his imminent attack, the Nephilim retreat to their capital in Idris and leave the Downworld free. Vampires, Faeries, Warlocks and Werewolves are left to their own devices and chaos erupts. Clary, Jace, and their friends go searching for Sebastian and look for the best way to defeat him. I thought this book was a good conclusion to this series, and appreciate how sacrifices needed to be made in order to resolve the conflict. I would recommend this series to anyone looking for a good read. – Catherine H. ’17

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The Shadowhunter’s Codex by Cassandra Clare (review by Catherine H. ’17)

The Shadowhunter's CodexThe Shadowhunter’s Codex by Cassandra Clare
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The Shadowhunter’s Codex has no particular plot, but is similar to something such as Harry Potter’s Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. The book explains the various tidbits of Nephilim culture among other things, with amusing notes from the characters of The Mortal Instruments series. A slow, but interesting read, one can learn about the weapons and types of Shadowhunters, as well as how to survive when dealing with Downworlders. I only recommend this book to avid fans of The Mortal Instruments or The Infernal Devices who have already finished the series. – Catherine H. ’17

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Dreams of Gods & Monsters by Laini Taylor (review by Maya V. ’17)

Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Daughter of Smoke & Bone, #3)Dreams of Gods & Monsters by Laini Taylor
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The last book in its trilogy, Dreams of Gods and Monsters is a warming, heart wrenching, and fulfilling finale. After years of the chimaera and seraphim warring brutally against each other, the two races are devastated. The few chimaera monsters left are being resurrected regularly after losing battles. The seraphim race has split into two armies: one led by the new king, Jael, who plans to invade Earth, and another called the Misbegotten. In this sequel, Karou of the chimaera, the main character of this trilogy, and her love interest Akiva of the Misbegotten unite their races to defeat Jael. With their shared dream of uniting their people forever, they fight to bring harmony to the land of Eretz. This novel completes the epic trilogy with no questions unanswered. Every detail of the characters’ lives, the history behind the land of Eretz, and the mystery of the seraphim’s magical powers are explained magnificently. The interesting look into the side characters’ personalities makes the novel even richer with side stories and backgrounds. However, to thoroughly enjoy and appreciate this novel, it is vital to read the preceding two books. This title is a must-read for young adults! – Maya V. ’17

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Days of Blood & Starlight by Laini Taylor (review by Maya V. ’17)

Days of Blood & Starlight (Daughter of Smoke & Bone, #2)Days of Blood & Starlight by Laini Taylor
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The sequel to Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Days of Blood and Starlight does not disappoint. Karou is now in the Middle East, living with the only chimaera left in the land of Eretz. After finding out about her past life and true identity as a part of the chimaera race, she feels that she must take action and save her people in the war against the angels. After her forbidden romance with the enemy, she is completely focused on helping the chimaera army grow stronger. However, she struggles to prove herself worthy to the others, who do not believe she can handle being a leader. She does not know which path to take: Should she continue to fight for power and lead the chimaera army to victory, or should she return to her mundane life as an average teenager? Should she seek help from the enemy, who she once trusted? This novel is a wonderful continuation of the first book in the series. The storyline grows more intense, nerve racking, and addictive after only the first few pages. Having read the second book with the same passion as the first, I can barely wait until the third is released in spring! – Maya V. ‘17

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Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick (review by Elisabeth S. ’16)

Hush, Hush (Hush, Hush, #1)Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Hush, Hush may have the dubious honor of being one of the worst books I’ve ever read. While chock-full of mixed metaphors, corny fight scenes, unintelligent dialogue, purple prose, and pointless descriptions, the novel also embodies YA rape culture. The relationship between Nora, the main character, and her love interest, Patch, is built off of her being terrified of him, while he dreams about killing her. Nora is noticeably uncomfortable as he continues to pursue her, harassing her in the middle of biology class as those around her pay no heed to her complaints. A heroine in any genre should not have to be terrified that her love interest is going to rape her. The rest of the personalities are two-dimensional stock-characters at best and disastrous at worst. Marcie Millar is made out to be the classic “mean girl,” even though she is demonized for flirting rather than actually being mean. The plot is flat and uninteresting. I would not recommend anyone approach Hush, Hush with a ten-foot pole. – Elisabeth S. ‘16

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City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (review by Lavinia D. ’17)

City of Bones (The Mortal Instruments, #1)City of Bones by Cassandra Clare
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

When Brooklyn teenager Clary Fray goes with her best friend Simon Lewis to a nightclub, the last thing she expects is to witness a murder – and to be the only one who sees it. Seeking answers, she meets Jace Wayland at the club, but suddenly, she is thrown into an unknown world fraught with danger, followed up with the news that her mother, Jocelyn, has been kidnapped by a man named Valentine in his search to find an object known as the Mortal Cup. Along with Jace and his adoptive siblings, Alec and Isabelle Lightwood, Clary starts to search for her mother and uncovers the truth about herself: she, along with Jace, Alec, and Isabelle, are part of a race called Shadowhunters – half-angel and half-human. In order to save her mother from Valentine’s evil clutches and retrieve the Mortal Cup, Clary must master her powers before it is too late. City of Bones was extremely riveting and had comedy thrown in at the perfect time. However, an overwhelming number of characters introduced in a short amount of time, made following along a bit difficult in the beginning. – Lavinia D. ‘17

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