All posts by Anoushka Chakravarty

Starsight by Brandon Sanderson (Review by Varun F. ’24)

Starsight (Skyward, #2)Starsight by Brandon Sanderson
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Starsight, by Brandon Sanderson, is the sequel to the incredibly popular young adult science fiction novel Skyward. Starsight expands on the universal adventures of pilot Spensa and her journeys to protect her home planet, Detritus. Although Skyward was an engaging and overall exciting read, Starsight falls short.

Starting with the positives: Brandon Sanderson does not lose his direct writing style and stunning visual imagery of action scenes and new environments that Spensa finds herself in. Spensa’s character remains intriguing, and M-Bot and Spensa’s interactions are still hilarious.

I found Starsight’s plot to be overly complex, with many new characters that aren’t explored fully. While reading the book, I found myself flipping back and forth through the pages to remind myself of who each of the characters were and what they looked like. Unlike that of Skyward, the plot of Starsight feels half-baked, and the ending is anticlimactic and mainly serves to introduce a cliff-hanger for Sanderson’s next novel in this series, Cytonic.

While I certainly enjoyed parts of this novel, I found myself confused about the tangled plot and excess of characters for the most part and was disappointed by the ending.

View all my reviews —Review by Varun F. ’24

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear (Review by Ritu B. ’24)

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad OnesAtomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones by James Clear
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Have you ever wished that you could overcome an addiction to your phone? Or start studying for that math test a week early instead of cramming it all in the night before? Well, to make a big change, you must start with many small changes, which is one of the many lessons I learned from Atomic Habits.

Overall, the book talks about how to create good habits, break bad habits, and achieve more with less effort. No gimmicks involved, just careful structuring of your environment, an intentional shift in your mindset, and the right routine.

Atomic Habits is one of the most approachable and reader-friendly books I’ve ever read. When you open up this book, you will quickly (and happily) notice that it is not written in the style of the great American novel. Rather, it has a conversational tone and is filled with bullet points, charts, and diagrams to break up blocks of text and emphasize key takeaways.

Additionally, the rules that the author outlines are simple enough that you can start implementing them into your life right away. For example, I implemented the first rule of making a bad habit invisible by putting my phone under a blanket and far away from my desk, which has reduced the number of times I pick it up while working.

I highly recommend Atomic Habits to anyone looking to be successful in life. —Review by Ritu B. ’24

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