Tag Archives: Action

I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore (review by Catherine H. ’17)

I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies, #1)I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Number Four has taken on many names, becoming John Smith after moving to Paradise, Ohio. He and nine other members of the Garde, the alien race of the planet Lorien were sent on the run on Earth when Mogadorians attacked and took over. Three have died and Four knows he is next. He falls in love, hoping to lead a normal life, but his dream is shattered when the Mogadorians learn of his location. Now, everyone in the town of Paradise is in danger and John must learn to survive. This book is packed with action and suspense. Pittacus Lore has dreamed up a fantastical world hidden within ours, making it a page-turner! The first book in the Lorien Legacies series, I am Number Four will lead to much more! – Catherine H. ‘17

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Frostbite by Richelle Mead (review by Tiffany Z. ’17)

Frostbite (Vampire Academy, #2)Frostbite by Richelle Mead
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The second book in the Vampire Academy series by Richelle Mead, Frostbite continues Rose Hathaway’s adventures with her best friend, the Moroi princess Lissa Dragomir. Mead introduces many fresh new characters and revisits old ones in a different light. The constant threat of a mass encounter with the evil Strigoi heightens suspense, and in fact, the novel culminates in a dramatic, definitive battle that leaves readers curious for what will come next in the series. Although there is less action than in the first book, Mead tells the story with the usual wit and precision. What lacks in physical conflict is wholly made up with intriguing complications in relationships, especially a romantic one between Rose and her mentor Dimitri Belikov. The significance of the relationship between Rose and her mother, however, is less clear. Also, many less significant events receive unwarranted attention. Overall, Frostbite assumes the role of a bridge to further titles and simultaneously delivers the excitement and vivid storytelling of a centerpiece of the series. – Tiffany Z. ‘17

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Watchmen by Alan Moore (review by Huck V. ’14)

WatchmenWatchmen by Alan Moore
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Watchmen, written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Dave Gibbons and colored by John Higgins, is among the most critically acclaimed graphic novels ever created. Illustrated in a traditional superhero style, Watchmen has an aura of nostalgia that comic connoisseurs will enjoy. It is a 1985 in which a band of American superheroes known as the Watchmen have already made their mark on history but have been relatively quiet for many years. Something, however, is afoot. Retired vigilantes are falling left and right while tensions between the USSR and the US are heating up. Elaborate personal histories enrich interweaving story lines. Moore pays homage to the classic superhero form while not conforming to traditional styles by any means. The plot escalates rapidly from start to finish culminating in a final scene that will leave readers wishing there were more pages to flip. – Huck V. ‘14

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The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton (review by Elisabeth S. ’16)

The OutsidersThe Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The Outsiders details the conflicts of adolescent Ponyboy as he and tries to find his way among the street gangs of his hometown. Hinton’s novel is weak. Artless prose replaces the jolting grittiness necessary to carry the toughness. The violence is bland and unrevealing. Hinton doesn’t convey the wrenching, heartfelt sentiment behind these events. The book ends up an expressionless shopping list of incidents of Ponyboy’s youth. The Outsiders may excite younger audiences, but will more likely irritate the more jaded readers. – Elisabeth S. ‘16

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Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas (review by Sophia S. ’15)

Throne of Glass (Throne of Glass, #1)Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Although this book’s plot is the worn out story line of a secret princess-assassin fighting a hidden evil with the help of a handsome prince and a captivating guard, the author inserts just enough originality to captivate the reader’s attention. The saving graces include perfectly timed and honed humor scattered throughout the dialogue, surprisingly sophisticated character development, and only a brief flirtation with the cliche of the girl torn between the two male protagonists (the author expresses disinterest in that age-old struggle before the end of the book). Maas sets up a sequel perfectly, and I will definitely read the second novel. Overall, avid readers of Tamora Pierce and Cassandra Clare will enjoy this action-packed and light romance. – Sophia S. ’15

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Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman (review by Mrs. Vaughan, Harker librarian)

Soon I Will Be InvincibleSoon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The world’s population includes nearly 2,000 super-powered beings. Some, like the recently escaped from high security prison Dr. Impossible, intend to rule the world. Fortunately the Champions, the world’s most famous team of superheroes, are bent on saving it. Narration flips between the obsessed evil genius Dr. Impossible and rookie Champion Fatale and leads us on a break neck ride through Impossible’s latest attempt at world domination in which he threatens a self-engineered ice age. The story includes wonderful action sequences, an imaginative set of beings that only a die-hard comic book fan could dream up and the very human side of these personalities. A pure delight from beginning to end, fans of Artemis Fowl, Ender’s Game and Terry Pratchett’s DiscWorld novels will love Grossman’s Soon I Will Be Invincible. – Mrs. Vaughan, Harker librarian

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