Tag Archives: Eddie S. ’17

Allegiant by Veronica Roth (review by Eddie S. ’17)

Allegiant (Divergent, #3)Allegiant by Veronica Roth
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Allegiant, the third and final installment of Veronica Roth’s critically acclaimed Divergent series, takes off immediately where the second book left off, providing readers with an effortless transition. Readers and characters alike are forced to cope and adapt to some new circumstances, however. Previously, as the factions are rendered merely a scheme, a newer, larger setting is introduced. In addition to the plot shift, alongside Tris’s love interest Tobias Eaton shares narration. Roth cleverly makes this change in order to provide further insight into their relationship and the individual development of the two protagonists. Truthfully, the genuine beauty of this book lies in the bold, visceral outcome of the story. Filled with raw, intense emotion, virtually no one is left unscathed, and the ending is bound to elicit acute feelings and startle readers. Roth alters several concepts in terms of narrative, develops the prevalent relationships and themes, and wraps up the story with a stirring ending, ultimately providing readers with a riveting finish to the trilogy that does not disappoint. – Eddie S. ‘17

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On Michael Jackson by Margo Jefferson (review by Eddie S. ’17)

On Michael JacksonOn Michael Jackson by Margo Jefferson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Margo Jefferson’s On Michael Jackson is a cultural analysis of the King of Pop, ultimately providing readers with the reason behind his bizarre actions that eventually acquire the pop star the infamous nickname of “Wacko Jacko.” While the first half primarily explores his childhood, the latter focuses on the notorious 2005 trial and his transformation from a reigning pop star to an erratic recluse. Additionally, Jefferson cleverly scatters a few of her unique interpretations of the pop star’s visually arresting performances and unforgettable music videos throughout. In the beginning, Jefferson makes known the cruelty and pain of Jackson’s hollow childhood despite the glamour of singing lead in the Jackson 5. Interestingly enough, the gem of the book lies in the transformation and trial, as it suggests the King of Pop’s methods. Although the book is well written, in the end, I found it incredibly disturbing. Jefferson’s last few pages leave us utterly startled, speechless, and disillusioned. Frankly, after being exposed to this monstrosity, I genuinely wish I would have watched Jackson’s lighthearted American Bandstand performance of “Abc” with his brothers and not gone beyond that. – Eddie S. ‘17

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The Postman Always Rings Twice by James M. Cain (review by Eddie S. ’17)

The Postman Always Rings TwiceThe Postman Always Rings Twice by James M. Cain
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

James M. Cain’s harrowing novel, The Postman Always Rings Twice, is narrated Frank Chamber. Upon arriving at a California diner, Frank instantly becomes attracted to Cora Papadakis, the woman who runs the restaurant with her husband. After developing mutual feelings for each other, the two lovers attempt to murder Mr. Papadakis, which ultimately leads to unexpected consequences. In essence, the entire book was a thrilling escapade, and I enjoyed it. Nevertheless, I found the characters to be exceedingly quixotic and the plot to be rather hectic. Additionally, without understanding the fundamentals of criminal justice, a few important parts of the novel were incomprehensible. Therefore, I would definitely recommend The Postman Always Rings Twice to those who take interest in fast-paced fiction and crime; otherwise, this book will leave you feeling discombobulated. – Eddie S. ‘17

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Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual by Michael Pollan (review by Eddie S. ’17)

Food Rules: An Eater's ManualFood Rules: An Eater’s Manual by Michael Pollan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Nowadays, deciding what and what not to eat is all about the nutrition facts, right? Well, Michael Pollan, in his book, Food Rules, makes it known that the nutritional label is actually not essential for maintaining a healthy eating lifestyle. In his 140 page book of 64 basic policies are three main concepts. Pollan drastically simplifies the process of picking the best foods to eat by stripping away indecipherable. I absolutely loved the various epigrams, proverbs, and adages scattered throughout the book. One of the most down-to-earth books I have ever read, Food Rules, is brief, brainy, and brilliant. Simply irresistible. -Eddie S. ’17

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Proof of Heaven by Eben Alexander (review by Eddie S. ’17)

Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the AfterlifeProof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife by Eben Alexander
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Near-death experiences have been recounted for centuries. Eben Alexander, a neurosurgeon, describes his recent one in his bestseller, Proof of Heaven. Alexander is suddenly diagnosed with a disease called meningitis, and the chances of surviving appear slim. He fatefully slips into a coma, and his spirit mysteriously voyages to the unknown realms of the afterlife. After being comatose for an entire week he suddenly wakes up, defying all odds. Proof of Heaven is fascinating yet bizarre. Alexander does a sensational job expressing the divinity of the afterlife. From the start, he sets the tone with his childhood dream of flying and maintains the peacefulness throughout the book. Alexander provides substantial emotional depth. Nevertheless, his description of the adventure is disappointingly short, and various moments are incomprehensible and dull. I would definitely recommend this book to those willing to step outside their comfort zone and try a book completely new. Readers of all kinds will find Proof of Heaven outlandish and satisfying. – Eddie S. ‘17

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