Tag Archives: Gaiman

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman (review by Fiona W. ’21)

NeverwhereNeverwhere by Neil Gaiman
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Richard Mayhew is an average young man who lives in modern-day London with an average life and and average job. One day, he finds a ragged and bloodied girl dying on the side of the road that nobody seems to notice but him. He takes it upon himself to help her and learns that two assassins are chasing her, and a whole city resides underneath London that he never even knew about.

As I have been a fan of many of Neil Gaiman’s books, I hoped this book would not disappoint. And it didn’t. The character development of all the main characters was unique and fulfilling. The imagery of each scene made me feel like I was right alongside Richard. And the ending still had me in tears.

Gaiman mentions in the introduction that while he is not one to write a sequel, he would love to revisit the world of this book again one day. (And I hope he does, too). As someone who dislikes fantasy novels, this book changed my mind about the genre and I hope it may impact you, dear reader, as well. – Fiona W. ‘21

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Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (review by Andrew R. ’17)

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, WitchGood Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch features a book-dealing angel named Aziraphale; his danger-loving demon acquaintance Crowley; and the eleven-year-old Adam Young, a resident of the town of Lower Tadfield who already commands his own gang. None of the three is what they seem. Aziraphale, the supposed epitome of good, has spent so much time with the human race that he may not actually be perfect, while Crowley, a servant of Satan, has embarrassingly picked up some positive qualities. Meanwhile, Adam, due to a mix-up at his birth, is the Antichrist, fated to bring about the ultimate destruction of the world. While Good Omens does contain commentary on the nature of good and evil, it does not read like a story with a moral, as each page is filled with humor and action. Occasional digressions from the main plotline, which often follow the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse and a seventeenth-century witch, add a complex and thought-provoking element to the book. Any reader willing to tolerate some good-natured jokes concerning the Biblewill thoroughly enjoy this light novel with serious, philosophic themes. – Andrew R. ’17

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