Tag Archives: Naomi M. ’16

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame (review by Naomi M. ’16)

The Wind in the WillowsThe Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame depicts the lives of three animals, Rat, Mole, and Toad, living by what is known simply as the River. The three are good friends, whose personalities balance each other out. Rat is the leader, Mole is loyal and down to earth, and Toad is rather mischievous. Many of the adventures they go on are undertaken to get Toad out of whatever trouble he’s gotten himself into, the last of which is reclaiming Toad’s house from the ferrets, stoats, and weasels who have commandeered it. The Wind in the Willows is a lovely, light novel suitable for anyone who wants a break from heavier literature. It is an immensely enjoyable world to experience – perfect for cozy winter nights. Wholeheartedly recommended. – Naomi M. ‘16

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Little Brother by Cory Doctorow (review by Naomi M. ’16)

Little Brother (Little Brother, #1)Little Brother by Cory Doctorow
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Terrorists have attacked San Francisco. The Department of Homeland Security takes a high school computer genius, Marcus, and his friends without any explanation to be brutally interrogated. Once released, Marcus finds that the government has turned his beloved city into a police state. Everyone is a potential threat. In order to bring down the paranoid authorities, he must figure out a way to bring the truth about the DHS to light. Armed with only his computer, Marcus sets a rebellion in motion larger than he could have dreamed possible. Reminiscent of George Orwell’s 1984, Little Brother is a novel of the future – where fighting is done through technology and anyone can change the world. Lovers of dystopian fiction, this is the one for you. – Naomi M. ‘16

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The Host by Stephenie Meyer (review by Naomi M. ’16)

The Host (The Host, #1)The Host by Stephenie Meyer
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Earth has been invaded by aliens. Rather, it is less of an invasion than an occupation. These particular aliens, called souls, survive by attaching themselves to a host, and controlling the body. Melanie Strider is a part of the human resistance, along with her younger brother Max and boyfriend Jared. They’re on their way to meet up with a larger group of humans in a secret camp in the desert when Melanie is captured and given a soul. This soul, named Wanderer, and Melanie become friends, and together they escape and set out for the camp. Because it is believed that a human could not survive with a soul, their welcome is tepid. Eventually, the humans accept Wanderer. Stephenie Meyer has done a wonderful job illustrating the intricacies of friendship, love, acceptance, and what it means to be human. Both Melanie and Wanderer are opposite, yet both strong, well-written characters. The Host is a wonderful novel for anyone who enjoys action, romance, and science fiction. – Naomi M. ‘16

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