Tag Archives: Series

Insurgent by Veronica Roth (review by Anahita F. ’17)

Insurgent (Divergent, #2)Insurgent by Veronica Roth
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Insurgent picks up where the Divergent leaves off. The five factions have broken up, and Erudite and Dauntless have united against the Abnegation. Tris and Four are forced to flee. They seek help from the two remaining neutral factions, Amity and Candor. Tris does what she feels is right, but will her actions be the ruin of everyone’s plans? Could her rash decisions hurt others? There is much more conflict in comparison to the first book, making it a bit hard to follow at times, but the sentimental portions made the novel well-balanced. I could really relate to all the characters’ feelings of loss, love, and fear throughout the book. It is nice to see that Roth does not incorporate the overused love triangle romance in her books. Overall, Insurgent’s utterly addictive, action-filled, and suspenseful storyline is an invigorating read. – Anahita F. ’17

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Matched by Ally Condie (review by Anahita F. ’17)

Matched (Matched, #1)Matched by Ally Condie
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Matched, by Ally Condie, is the first of a dystopian fiction trilogy that will have you hooked to the end. Can you imagine every little part of your life planned out for you? Your lifestyle, future relationship, and the day of your death predetermined? That is the world Cassia lives in – until the day of her matching ceremony, when she is assigned her soulmate and best friend Xander. However, a glitch in the system momentarily reveals another boy’s face to her, Ky. Suddenly, Cassia questions her fate. Is it possible to love someone else? Her grandfather’s message dares Cassia to examine her options and shake up years of tradition. In the meantime, the consequences of her forbidden love stir up trouble. In many ways, the strict rules and futuristic feel in Matched reminded me of The Hunger Games and Divergent. I was disappointed to see Condie author create a love triangle, making Cassia choose between the mysterious and dangerous Ky, or the familiar and sweet Xander. However, Matched appealed to me because of how well written and thought out it is. It is not hard to follow, and the romance is enticing! – Anahita F. ’17

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A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin (review by Akshay B. ’16)

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A Game of Thrones is the first book in George R. R. Martin’s series A Song of Ice and Fire, set in the land of Westeros in times of magic, dragons, and knights. The story has several lead characters, each with their own story, yet everything they do is connected. The major characters fight for their lives, either against enemies who would slay every living creature, or against enemies who compete for the Iron Throne. Martin’s brilliant writing allows the readers to feel the emotions of the characters and care for them. As the queen of Westeros says “When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die.” If you watch or plan to watch the mini-series, you’ll want to read A Game of Thrones first. – Akshay B. ‘16

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The Elite by Kiera Cass (review by Nitya M. ’15)

The Elite (The Selection, #2)The Elite by Kiera Cass
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Only six of thirty-five girls remain in The Selection, the cutthroat competition to become the wife of Prince Maxon and princess of Illea. Yet America Singer holds the power in her hands to end the battle instantly by telling the prince that she can return the love he bestows upon her. Floundering in a sea of uncertainty, America is unable to decide between the dangerous romance and memories of Aspen, guard and longtime friend, and the breathtaking experiences that shape her relationship with Maxon. Each time she thinks she’s made up her mind, her world is brought crashing down. The Elite, the second book in Kiera Cass’s trilogy, continues the fast paced style of its prequel, but ultimately forsakes action for a love triangle that slows the story of The Selection to a crawl. While The Elite is still a page-turner, this second novel, like Suzanne Collins’ Catching Fire, loses its appeal to sappy romance. – Nitya M. ‘15

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City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (review by Lavinia D. ’17)

City of Bones (The Mortal Instruments, #1)City of Bones by Cassandra Clare
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

When Brooklyn teenager Clary Fray goes with her best friend Simon Lewis to a nightclub, the last thing she expects is to witness a murder – and to be the only one who sees it. Seeking answers, she meets Jace Wayland at the club, but suddenly, she is thrown into an unknown world fraught with danger, followed up with the news that her mother, Jocelyn, has been kidnapped by a man named Valentine in his search to find an object known as the Mortal Cup. Along with Jace and his adoptive siblings, Alec and Isabelle Lightwood, Clary starts to search for her mother and uncovers the truth about herself: she, along with Jace, Alec, and Isabelle, are part of a race called Shadowhunters – half-angel and half-human. In order to save her mother from Valentine’s evil clutches and retrieve the Mortal Cup, Clary must master her powers before it is too late. City of Bones was extremely riveting and had comedy thrown in at the perfect time. However, an overwhelming number of characters introduced in a short amount of time, made following along a bit difficult in the beginning. – Lavinia D. ‘17

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Requiem by Lauren Oliver (review by Karen T. ’16)

Requiem (Delirium, #3)Requiem by Lauren Oliver
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

In a world where love is a disease that must be treated and eliminated, Lena Tiddle has joined the rebellion against the cure and its advocates. As regulators begin encroaching into the abandoned wasteland where the rebellion is sheltered, Lena and the other Invalids trek across the Wilds gathering supporters and converts alike in preparation for their retaliation. While the premise to Lauren Oliver’s Requiem is promising, the plot is slow to start and descends into the typical cliched love triangle that plagues many young adult novels. Additionally, the narration is split between two separate viewpoints that both break up the story line and confuse the reader. However, the buildup to the ultimate conflict and the dénouement are redeeming aspects of this novel. As the story line relies heavily on elements from the first books in the trilogy, only readers who have read Delirium and Pandemonium will fully enjoy Requiem. – Karen T. ‘16

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Chasing the Prophecy by Brandon Mull (review by Kai A. ’17)

Chasing the Prophecy (Beyonders, #3)Chasing the Prophecy by Brandon Mull
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

When transported magically from Earth to Lyrian, Jason and Rachel simply wanted to return home. They have been flung into a dire and seemingly hopeless conflict against the evil tyrant and wizard Maldor. The improbability of victory is repeatedly expressed, so much so that it gets tiring. Still, when the action gets going, the book becomes fast-paced and adventurous. Mull not only does well in depicting the battles, but he also describes Jason and Rachel’s coming of age as well as the sense of unification and sacrifice. Mull plants the beginnings of a new plot at the end of the last book of the trilogy, rendering the conclusion to the main plot unsatisfying. In summary, this novel is decent but probably not Mull’s best, a slightly disappointing end to a good series. – Kai A. ‘17

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Gone by Michael Grant (review by Catherine H. ’17)

Gone (Gone, #1)Gone by Michael Grant
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

When a dome-shaped force field surrounds Perdido Beach, California and every person over the age of fifteen disappears, the children begin to freak out. Sam Temple, the protagonist, is praised after pulling a young girl out of a flaming apartment. Strangely, the children begin discovering powers and mutations, thought to be the product of leftover radiation leak many years ago. Caine Soren from Coates Academy, a school for the delinquent children of wealthy families, uses his charisma to take charge. The two teenagers fight for power in what has been nicknamed the FAYZ, or Fallout Alley Youth Zone. In this thrilling book, a dystopian society emerges and the children must learn to survive until the age of fifteen when they vanish, poofing out of the FAYZ.. I found this book somewhat dark, yet very original and empowering. It is the first installment in the popular Gone series. – Catherine H. ‘17

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Frostbite by Richelle Mead (review by Tiffany Z. ’17)

Frostbite (Vampire Academy, #2)Frostbite by Richelle Mead
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The second book in the Vampire Academy series by Richelle Mead, Frostbite continues Rose Hathaway’s adventures with her best friend, the Moroi princess Lissa Dragomir. Mead introduces many fresh new characters and revisits old ones in a different light. The constant threat of a mass encounter with the evil Strigoi heightens suspense, and in fact, the novel culminates in a dramatic, definitive battle that leaves readers curious for what will come next in the series. Although there is less action than in the first book, Mead tells the story with the usual wit and precision. What lacks in physical conflict is wholly made up with intriguing complications in relationships, especially a romantic one between Rose and her mentor Dimitri Belikov. The significance of the relationship between Rose and her mother, however, is less clear. Also, many less significant events receive unwarranted attention. Overall, Frostbite assumes the role of a bridge to further titles and simultaneously delivers the excitement and vivid storytelling of a centerpiece of the series. – Tiffany Z. ‘17

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Divergent by Veronica Roth (review by Anushka D. ’15)

Divergent (Divergent, #1)Divergent by Veronica Roth
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Imagine a dystopia in which everyone at the age of 16 must choose one of five factions: Dauntless, Amity, Abnegation, Candor, or Erudite. Created at first to balance and seam together society, the system soon threatens to fall apart because of greed and corruption. Veronica Roth frames the story through the eyes of Beatrice Prior, a girl who must choose her faction and deal with the decaying structure of her world. Beatrice captures the hearts of readers easily; she is incredibly brave, selfless, and intelligent. While the book presents a wonderfully unique and fascinating society that is struggling to keep itself upright, it also ensnares readers through the battles Beatrice fights with herself, her family, her friends, and the boy she grows to love. Divergent is beautifully written and extremely hard to put down. I am definitely looking forward to its sequel: Insurgent. Recommended for fans of The Hunger Games. –Anushka D. ‘15

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