Tag Archives: Adams

The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (review by Anya W. ’20)

The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy: A Trilogy in Five PartsThe Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: A Trilogy in Five Parts by Douglas Adams
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

On a rather boring Thursday, a rather boring (but mostly harmless) planet known as Earth is demolished by a Vogon construction crew to clear room for a new hyperspace overpass, along with most of its inhabitants, who rather unfortunately had yet to invent a method of faster than light travel and therefore had neglected to see the clearly posted notice in Alpha Centauri. Ford Prefect, writer for a new edition of the “Hitch Hiker’s Guide” and alien who’s been stranded on Earth for the past decade-and-a-half is not content with vaporization. He takes up his usual pastime, Hitchhiking, bringing along one Arthur Dent, a boring, regular, specimen of humanity if there ever was one, who also happens to be a very good friend.

One of the landmark novels of science fiction and a great influencer of pop culture, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is a must read. Adams writes a ridiculous romp through worlds and galaxies on an unimaginable scale, and mixes ridiculousness with unspeakable horrors in just the right proportion to make his book a comedy instead of a textbook. One of the great advantages of science fiction and fantasy novels is the ability to wave away plot holes with “magic” or “science,” but the methods Adams uses to rationalize his fantastical universe are so creative that they hardly deserve the title of Applied Phlebotinum. – Anya W. ’20

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The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams (review by Lauren L. ’17)

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Guide, #2)The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The second installation of Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide series, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe continues the adventures of the three-headed, two-armed ex-president of the universe, his cousin, his girlfriend, and an unfortunate and bewildered human being. (And a depressed robot, but of course, everybody’s already forgotten about him.) Just as absurd as the first book of the series, Restaurant, reveals the man who actually controls the entirety of the universe and sends Arthur and Ford to Earth two million years ago, where they find that a group of telephone sanitizers, hairdressers, and marketers aren’t the best people to start a new civilization, since sticks are best used as curling tongs, and to discover fire, you need to first research it to find what people want from it. Just like the previous book, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe will be enjoyable to all . Lauren L. ’17

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The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (review by Mr. Silk)

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1)The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If there was ever a book that defines comedic science fiction, this is it. Based on his own radio scripts (which are also available to read) The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is the first of six books that tell the story of Arthur Dent, a mild-mannered, somewhat helpless Earthling who gets swept up into a space adventure with his best friend Ford, who happens to be an alien, when the Earth is unceremoniously destroyed. Adams keeps the pace brisk in this short novel, introducing a variety of wacky characters as Arthur and Ford hitchhike across the galaxy. Although the science fiction is much more fiction than science, the dialogue is crisp, and the laugh-out-loud moments are frequent. And, while the rest of the series never captures the brilliance of this first book, you’ll be eager to find out what happens to Arthur’s motley crew – if only to discover why all your friends think the number 42 is so hysterical. – Mr. Silk, Harker teacher

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Watership Down by Richard Adams (review by Stanley Z. ’16)

Watership DownWatership Down by Richard Adams
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Watership Down by Richard Adams is about rabbits who embark on a venture to secure a new burrow after a young rabbit named Fiver prophesizes that their old one will be soon decimated. However, Fiver is unable to convince the chief, so he sets off with a small group of rabbits for a new home. The group endures cats and dogs which threaten the group. Fiver’s vision turns out to be correct, and many rabbits in the old burrow are massacred by humans. Watership Downis a little like The Aeneid except all the human characters are represented as rabbits. Recommended to anyone who enjoys adventure novels that are well-paced and fun to read. – Stanley Z. ‘16

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