Tag Archives: Lauren L. ’17

The October Country by Ray Bradbury (review by Lauren L. ’17)

The October CountryThe October Country by Ray Bradbury
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The October Country is a collection of short stories in which Bradbury explores the consequences of reality as we know it brushing against a supernatural world. Each story is different – some characters respond with fear, some a determined naiveté and courage. Through them, he explores the flaws and habits of humanity in general as well as of commonplace qualities of the average person. Not every story is as enjoyable as it might be, and in some ways, the stories are too predictable, not in the unimaginative zombie apocalypse or haunted house sort of way, but in that it’s fairly obvious where the plot is going. Nevertheless, they are worth the read. Anyone who enjoys both the supernatural and horror (even if it’s not all that scary) would enjoy The October Country. – Lauren L. ’17

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The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes (review by Lauren L. ’17)

The Sense of an EndingThe Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Sense of an Ending is a remarkable story spanning forty years stemming from the protagonist’s acquaintance with a man he had known for less than a decade before the man unexpectedly commits suicide. It is blunt in its telling, the protagonist exposing his own ignorance throughout life as well as the many inadvisable decisions he had made and interspersing among them happier memories. It is refreshing to see his joys and regrets, all reluctantly accepted, and they reveal what he truly values in his life. The ending is unexpected and somewhat confusing; however, when the full implications of what had happened are understood, the shock value is enough for the book, and the questions it provokes, to linger in the reader’s mind for days afterward. Though it may not be enjoyable for all, I firmly believe that everyone should at least read the first few pages before deciding definitively whether or not The Sense of an Ending is to their taste. – Lauren L. ’17

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The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams (review by Lauren L. ’17)

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Guide, #2)The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The second installation of Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide series, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe continues the adventures of the three-headed, two-armed ex-president of the universe, his cousin, his girlfriend, and an unfortunate and bewildered human being. (And a depressed robot, but of course, everybody’s already forgotten about him.) Just as absurd as the first book of the series, Restaurant, reveals the man who actually controls the entirety of the universe and sends Arthur and Ford to Earth two million years ago, where they find that a group of telephone sanitizers, hairdressers, and marketers aren’t the best people to start a new civilization, since sticks are best used as curling tongs, and to discover fire, you need to first research it to find what people want from it. Just like the previous book, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe will be enjoyable to all . Lauren L. ’17

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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (review by Lauren L. ’17)

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Set in a dystopian future after a devastating war, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? later became the inspiration for the film Blade Runner and cleverly utilizes the unspoken need for company and labor that created the market demand for androids in the first place to emphasize the empathy and lack of appearing in the human race. The protagonist, Rick Deckard, is a bounty hunter who finds and kills rogue androids for the police on a dying Earth where animals have become a precious rarity and owning and caring for one is an indication of humanity. Most people have left to colonize Mars, and Deckard is trapped in a claustrophobic marriage with ownership of only a single animal- an android sheep. Though the writing itself didn’t appear to be anything special, the plot and the action are transfixing enough for any sci-fi reader to enjoy. – Lauren L.’17

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