Tag Archives: Camille P. ’14

Zeitoun by Dave Eggers (review by Camille P. ’14)

ZeitounZeitoun by Dave Eggers
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Dave Eggers’ Zeitoun is the true story of Syrian Muslim Abdulrahman Zeitoun and his family, living in New Orleans between 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. In the midst of disaster and chaos, Zeitoun is forced to face social stigmas the American government has against him, and the consequences of its cultural profiling. This book sheds light on a number of social injustices many encountered after Katrina hit and the complete anarchy the city of New Orleans was in. The sentence structure is simple and effective, and the author portrays emotions and thought-processes well as he artfully weaves the past and present together. A page-turner, I was able to finish this book in three days. The powerful story of this family is touching, and as someone who does not often love non-fiction, I fully enjoyed reading this book. – Camille P. ‘14

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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon (review by Camille P. ’14)

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-TimeThe Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time is a moving story told through the eyes of an autistic adolescent boy. What starts as a mystery novel as the narrator tries to decipher who killed his neighbor’s pet poodle, morphs into an uplifting often humorous story about a boy forced to face his greatest fears. When he travels to a train station, for example, he is overwhelmed by unfamiliarity. Haddon merely states facts and allows the reader space for analysis. The denouement and ending are short and rather abrupt, but they do not detract from the overall enjoyment. With only 250 pages, this book is a fast read. – Camille P. ’14

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The Speed of Light by Elizabeth Rosner (review by Camille P. ’14)

The Speed of LightThe Speed of Light by Elizabeth Rosner
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The Speed of Light is about Julian, his younger sister, Paula, and Paula’s housekeeper, Sola, whose current lives are dictated by their frightening pasts. The siblings’ father was persecuted during the Holocaust, marking their childhood with sorrow. Sola’s village in Mexico was brutally attacked by rebels of the government. Now, in present day, they are all brought together in Berkeley, California, and with the help of one another, they must somehow overcome their histories. Rosner’s alternating use of three different perspectives and beautiful imagery kept me turning pages. What deterred me were the slow pace of the plot and the predictability of the ending. I would recommend Speed of Light to a friend looking for a light, feel-good novel about the art of healing. – Camille P. ’14

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