Tag Archives: Humor

Thief of Time by Terry Pratchett (review by Andrew T. ’17)

Thief of Time (Discworld, #26)Thief of Time by Terry Pratchett
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Thief of Time‘s pantheon of characters, including Death, his granddaughter Susan, famed warrior monk and janitor Lu-Tze,and his disciple Lobsang Ludd, have a problem, namely, the apocalypse next Wednesday. Armed with an orange cream chocolate in each hand, the heroes must fight the Auditors, a race bent on the destruction of humanity. This hilarious, wacky fantasy novel strays from the well-beaten path of dwarves, elves, and humans, in favor of creatures such as history monks, yetis, and Igors. It reminds the reader at every step that nothing is what it seems in a way that is entertaining rather than cliché. Fans of the ongoing Discworld series will see some old faces, yet those unfamiliar with the books will not feel lost. Anyone wanting a good time and a good laugh should definitely read Terry Pratchett’s Thief of Time. – Andrew T. ‘17

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Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman (review by Andrew R. ’17)

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, WitchGood Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch features a book-dealing angel named Aziraphale; his danger-loving demon acquaintance Crowley; and the eleven-year-old Adam Young, a resident of the town of Lower Tadfield who already commands his own gang. None of the three is what they seem. Aziraphale, the supposed epitome of good, has spent so much time with the human race that he may not actually be perfect, while Crowley, a servant of Satan, has embarrassingly picked up some positive qualities. Meanwhile, Adam, due to a mix-up at his birth, is the Antichrist, fated to bring about the ultimate destruction of the world. While Good Omens does contain commentary on the nature of good and evil, it does not read like a story with a moral, as each page is filled with humor and action. Occasional digressions from the main plotline, which often follow the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse and a seventeenth-century witch, add a complex and thought-provoking element to the book. Any reader willing to tolerate some good-natured jokes concerning the Biblewill thoroughly enjoy this light novel with serious, philosophic themes. – Andrew R. ’17

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Crash by Nicole Williams (review by Anushka D. ’15)

Crash (Crash, #1)Crash by Nicole Williams
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

When Lucy meets the stunning Jude Ryder before her junior year, she can’t help the romantic notions that dance in her head. It only takes one conversation, however, for Lucy to realize that Jude is more of a bad boy than a prince. When Jude refuses to let her go, promising that he will change, Lucy soon finds that she is having trouble staying away. But can Jude really throw away his past completely? Crashis the epitome of a teen romance novel: shy girl, dazzling boy, and forbidden love. Williams’ novel slightly differs from the clichéd love tragedy due to Lucy’s snarky, independent, and hilarious narration, but the rest is predictable and laugh-out-loud sappy. The writing provides little description of both the scenery and the character’s emotions, leaving readers to fill in the blanks. All in all, Crash disappoints with its unoriginal plotline and lousy writing and leaves no promise for a better sequel. – Anushka D. ’15

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Beauty Queens by Libba Bray (review by Sana A. ’17)

Beauty QueensBeauty Queens by Libba Bray
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Libba Bray’s Beauty Queens begins with fifty beauty pageant contestants on a plane to The Miss Teen Dream Pageant, which is hosted by The Corporation. When the plane crashes, hilarity ensues. Bray’s wit and sarcasm is on every page. The characters may, at first, seem like perfect representations of their stereotype; but upon closer look, they are anything but. As they scramble to survive, the girls grow close and realize that The Corporation — and its numerous products and television shows — has only been damaging society’s view of women. Adding pirates, hilarious commercial breaks, a view of what is happening at the secret Corporation base, and insight into many of the girls’ backstories, Bray has created a tightly interwoven novel that expertly combines humor, action, romance, and a little bit of feminism. This fun and light female-oriented read will make one snicker and sigh as they are swept away with a group of beauty queens. – Sana A. ‘17

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The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde (review by Kai A. ’17)

The Last Dragonslayer (The Last Dragonslayer, #1)The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Indentured orphan Jennifer Strange is a witty teenager working as secretary for Kazam Mystical Arts Management, which offers its magical services in a world where magic, once powerful, has recently started to wane. Suddenly, she becomes the last dragonslayer and must save the world’s magic. Author Jasper Fforde specializes in building believable worlds and creating realistic but fantastic characters while maintaining a light and comical tone. His unpredictable and intricate plot has some inconsistencies and gaps of logic noticeable to the meticulous reader. In addition to an exciting ride, the plot becomes a vehicle of commentary on the corruption and greed of mankind. Overall, this is a enjoyable read and the first in the Chronicles of Kazam series that promises much more. – Kai A. ‘17

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The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett (review by Andrew R. ’17)

The Color of Magic (Discworld, #1)The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The Color of Magic is merely a gateway into Terry Pratchett’s wildly popular Discworld series, but it is certainly not his strongest or smoothest novel. The plot follows Rincewind, an incompetent and cowardly wizard, as he leads the tourist Twoflower on a tour of the Discworld. As the entire story takes place on a flat world that balances precariously on the backs of four celestial elephants, it’s easy to predict that the book’s storyline will be hectic and eccentric. Unfortunately, this randomness is the novel’s downfall. Sudden plot twists and rushed battle scenes confuse and ultimately distract the reader from Pratchett’s witty writing. Overall, while avid readers of fantasy may enjoy this book, it is really only worth as an introduction to the subsequent and higher-quality Discworld titles, none of which need to be read in any particular order. – Andrew R. ‘17

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