Tag Archives: Riordan

The Blood of Olympus by Rick Riordan (review by Catherine H. ’17)

The Blood of Olympus (The Heroes of Olympus, #5)The Blood of Olympus by Rick Riordan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The fifth and final installment in Rick Riordan’s Heroes of Olympus series fails to impress. As the demigods of the prophecy travel on the Argo II to save the world, Reyna, Nico, and Coach Hedge struggle to travel across the world to deliver the Athena Parthenos to the Greeks as a peace offering. The gods are still split into their Greek and Roman selves due to the Romans preparing to attack the Greeks at Camp Half Blood. The Earth Mother, Gaea, is close to waking and the monsters are eager to spill demigod blood to wake her. It has its funny moments, but did not leave a lasting impression on me. In fact, the ending is incredibly cliché and nothing was particularly memorable. The series has dragged on for long enough and I’m glad that it has finally come to an end. The Blood of Olympus is alright and provides a satisfactory ending, but I only recommend it to fans of Riordan’s works. – Catherine H. ’17

View all my reviews

The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan (review by Nikita R. ’16)

The Sea of Monsters (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #2)The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thirteen-year-old Percy Jackson is once again brought into a world full of danger and uncertainty when he undertakes a dangerous quest to rescue his best friend Grover from a vulgar, monstrous Cyclops. Traveling with his half-brother Tyson and his comrade Annabeth, the trio experiences a lifetime of adventures as they encounter the mythological foes of legends, from the cunning sorceress Circe to the fearsome monster Charybdis. Full of engrossing, distinct characters, the strongest point of Sea of Monsters is the rich, humorous dialogue that reveals a phenomenal level of characterization, while also making the reader chuckle. Riordan’s world of mythological wonder mixed with relatable personal struggle makes this novel a must-read for teenagers and adults alike. – Nikita R. ’16

View all my reviews