Tag Archives: Nikita R. ’16

Glass by Ellen Hopkins (review by Nikita R. ’16)

Glass (Crank, #2)Glass by Ellen Hopkins
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Suddenly dealt with the responsibilities of motherhood, Kristina Snow must somehow raise a child while battling her addiction to “the monster,” known as crystal meth. Despite her love for her child, Kristina finds herself becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the monotony of her daily life in comparison to the excitement of her past. In Glass, the second sequel in the Crank series, Ellen Hopkins once again brings to life the story of a confused, desperate teenager who has become swept up in a world she is not ready for. Although the average reader has not necessarily shared Kristina’s experiences, any teenager or adult will understand her emotions and decisions. This book is a must-read, for teenagers especially. – Nikita R. ‘16

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The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan (review by Nikita R. ’16)

The Sea of Monsters (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, #2)The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thirteen-year-old Percy Jackson is once again brought into a world full of danger and uncertainty when he undertakes a dangerous quest to rescue his best friend Grover from a vulgar, monstrous Cyclops. Traveling with his half-brother Tyson and his comrade Annabeth, the trio experiences a lifetime of adventures as they encounter the mythological foes of legends, from the cunning sorceress Circe to the fearsome monster Charybdis. Full of engrossing, distinct characters, the strongest point of Sea of Monsters is the rich, humorous dialogue that reveals a phenomenal level of characterization, while also making the reader chuckle. Riordan’s world of mythological wonder mixed with relatable personal struggle makes this novel a must-read for teenagers and adults alike. – Nikita R. ’16

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Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion (review by Nikita R. ’16)

Warm Bodies (Warm Bodies, #1)Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

R, a zombie living in apocalyptic world, finds himself unsure about the simplicity of his newly resurrected life. Unable to vocalize his doubts and beliefs, R continues to groan along with his fellow zombies for decades, until the day he preys upon a young teenage boy named Perry. Infused with Perry’s love for his girlfriend Julie, R rescues her. In an unlikely romance, R and Julie begin to teach each other the true meaning of living. Although a zombie book doesn’t seem sweet or profound, Marion manages to incorporate a touching romance inside of a book that questions every aspect of society. The illustrative language and complex characters will not disappoint readers. Warm Bodies will be appreciated by both teenagers and adults alike. – Nikita R. ‘16

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Reasons to by Happy by Katrina Kittle (review by Nikita R. ’16)

Reasons to Be HappyReasons to Be Happy by Katrina Kittle
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Normally spunky and fearless, Hannah Carlisle begins to succumb to her insecurities as she enters a cruel high school, struggles with an imperfect figure, and worst-of-all, confronts her mother’s cancer. Despite her affluent household and movie-star parents, Hannah experiences emotions relatable to any teenager. Through her personal fight against bulimia, she provides an insightful view into the destructive nature of eating disorders, along with an inspiring account of struggling to remain true to herself despite peer pressure. Reasons to Be Happy is a great read for almost any teenager, and would be enjoyed by most adults too. – Nikita R. ‘16

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Unwind by Neal Shusterman (review by Nikita R. ’16)

Unwind (Unwind, #1)Unwind by Neal Shusterman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Imagine a world where teenagers are at a constant risk to be “unwound,” or have their body parts harvested to be donated later, by their parents. This sociological dystopia can be viewed in Neal Shusterman’s novel Unwind, a must-read. Poignant and illustrative, the story not only fully draws the readers into a grippingly heart-rending world but also raises questions about many current societal controversies, for instance abortion. Told from the viewpoints of three different desperate teenagers, Unwind is an engaging tale about a fight to survive while questioning existence itself. The first book in the Unwind Trilogy, Unwind is especially recommended for readers who appreciate powerful, complex characters, but will be relished by people of any age. – Nikita R. ’16

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